0
votes
0answers
41 views

The Graphic Representation of Physical Quantities (Vectors only)

We usually use the figure such as the one below for the graphic representation of physical quantities such as forces: What should we call this figure? Should we call it a ray? But a ray is defined ...
0
votes
2answers
121 views

velocity confusion

A velocity encompasses both speed and direction in a single vector. I'm a little bit confused about how to separate the two. I have 2 creatures. The first is located at position (x1, y1). The second ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Question Concerning Magnitude And Direction Of The Accleration For Uniform Circular Motion

To find the magnitude and direction of the acclleration for the uniform circular motion,we consider the below figure Where in particle $p$ moves at constant speed $v$ around a circle of radius ...
0
votes
1answer
296 views

transforming vector potential with a coordinate rotation

In electrodynamics, given the vector potential $\vec{A}$, the magnetic field is defined as: $\vec{B} = \nabla \times \vec{A}$ I'm having trouble figuring out how a coordinate transformation (a ...
2
votes
1answer
824 views

Solid body rotation around 2-axes

I am trying to understand how to describe the rotation of a solid body flying in 3D space. From physics forums, I understand that the rotation of any solid object in space, is around 2 axes ...
5
votes
2answers
619 views

Aren't asteroids contradicting Euler's rotation theorem?

I am totally confused about Euler's rotation theorem. Normally I would think that an asteroid could rotate around two axes simultaneously. But Euler's rotation theorem states that: In geometry, ...
3
votes
2answers
378 views

Diffraction and Computer Generated Holography Calculations

I've tried this through Mathematica, and hit my own limit in math ability trying to do this, both to no avail. I'm assuming there is no way to do so, as a simple solution to this problem would be a ...
9
votes
2answers
489 views

Geometrical construction for Snell's law?

Snell's law from geometrical optics states that the ratio of the angles of incidence $\theta_1$ and of the angle of refraction $\theta_2$ as shown in figure1, is the same as the opposite ratio of the ...