0
votes
1answer
60 views

Show how to map the semicircle $x^2 +y^2 = 1$, $y > 0$, onto $(x−1)^2+y^2 = 4$, $y > 0$, by a combination of $z \to z+l$ and $z \to kz$.

I need some help with this one! One can begin to understand the geometric significance of linear fractional transformations of the half plane by studying the simplest ones, $z \to z+l$ and $z \to kz$ ...
1
vote
1answer
234 views

Covert Euclidean distance to Hyperbolic distance

I am searching for formulae to convert Euclidean distance into hyperbolic distance. The problem that I am confronting is that I want to calculate if a bug travels x units in Euclidean space, how much ...
1
vote
1answer
109 views

justifying reflection across line in beltrami-klein model

Justify the following construction of the Klein reflection A' of A across m. Let Λ be an end of m and P be the pole of m. Join Λ to A and let this line cut y (which is the circle, my note) ...
1
vote
1answer
84 views

Projecting external points to a circle: Distance order preserving?

Given a circle, and a set of points $A$ that lie external to the circle; I perform the following simple operation: I compute the point of intersection of the i) circle and the ii) line joining each ...
4
votes
1answer
176 views

Characterization of linearity in terms of metric

At least in Euclidean geometry and the upper half plane model of hyperbolic geometry, the statements '$y$ lies on the line segment determined by $x$ and $z$ ' and '$d(x,y)+d(y,z)=d(x,z) $' are ...
3
votes
1answer
158 views

Why are perpendicular bisectors 'lines'?

Given two points $p$ and $q$ their bisector is defined to be $l(p,q)=\{z:d(p,z)=d(q,z)\}$. Due to the construction in Euclidean geometry, we know that $l(p,q)$ is a line, that is, for $x,y,z\in ...
3
votes
1answer
215 views

Is there a similar formula in spherical and hyperbolic geometry as Euclidean Geometry?

In an Euclidean plane, we know that the area of a triangle is determined by the length of base and the height, then is there a similar thing do happen in Spherical and hyperbolic spaces? In ...
92
votes
4answers
2k views

Hyperbolic critters studying Euclidean geometry

You've spent your whole life in the hyperbolic plane. It's second nature to you that the area of a triangle depends only on its angles, and it seems absurd to suggest that it could ever be otherwise. ...