For requesting, clarifying, and comparing definitions of mathematical terms.

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2
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1answer
105 views

What is a regular homotopy?

The definition of regular homotopy from Wikipedia says that two immersion $f,g:M\to N$ are regularly homotopic if they represent points in the same path-component of $\text{Imm}(M,N)$. What does "...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

Questions which have false conditions

There are many "questions" on the internet like If $$1=5$$ $$2=6$$ $$3=7$$ $$4=8$$ then how many is $5$? With one "logic" answer is $9$ because $n=n+4$, then $5=9$. With other "logic" ...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

Is “algebraic system” the same as “algebraic structure”?

1. algebraic system | planetmath.org: http://planetmath.org/algebraicsystem It seems that algebraic system is only a set on which some operations are defined. Is it necessary that some additional ...
2
votes
1answer
506 views

The Sobolev Space $H^{1/2}$

this is a very stupid question. In my course of linear PDEs, the professor used $H^{1/2}$ without defining, and I have looking on google to find a definition, but the only related thing I found was $H^...
2
votes
1answer
89 views

Show a function is well defined

My understanding of a function being well defined: Let $(G,\circ)$ be a group and let $H\unlhd G$ be a normal subgroup. Let $G/H=\{ah\mid a\in G\}$. For a group $(G/H,\star)$(the quotient ...
2
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2answers
55 views

A question about two common definitions

Two definitions make me puzzled ! 1. The definition of $\textbf{Functions Differentiable at a Point}$: A function $f$ defined in a neighborhood $(x_{0}-\delta,x_{0}+\delta)$of a point $x_{0}$, ...
0
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0answers
21 views

Word for two objects with coplanar axes.

Is there a suitable word for describing two objects with coplanar axes (e.g. cylinders)? The word parallel springs to mind, but I wondered if there was anything more specific.
3
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3answers
88 views

Which quadrant is the “first quadrant”?

In the coordinate plane split into four quadrants by the $x$- and $y$-axes, I learned (educated in a public school in the U.S.) that the "first quadrant" was the one with both $x$ and $y$ positive, ...
0
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1answer
92 views

What is the definition of a properly-immersed arc?

I am going over a paper in which a theorem includes a condition that certain arcs are "properly-immersed geodesic arcs" in a surface $\Sigma$ with nonempty boundary. I have done a search, but I have ...
2
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1answer
85 views

What is an adjoint operator?

The following conjeture is stated here: Every adjoint operator has a non-trivial closed invariant subspace. Reference 11 where adjoint is supposedly defined can be found here. But I don't have ...
7
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5answers
555 views

Is $1234567891011121314151617181920212223…$ an integer?

This question came from that one and from that talk where it's noted that "integers have a finite count of digits", so that the "number" in the title is not at all a number (not integer nor rational ...
4
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2answers
124 views

Multiplication Operation

I am a father of two young boys and I looks forward to exploring mathematics with them for as long as they will let me :-). I would really like for them to have a deeper understanding of mathematics ...
11
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2answers
235 views

Is function $f:\mathbb C-\{0\}\rightarrow\mathbb C$ prescribed by $z\rightarrow \large \frac{1}{z}$ by definition discontinuous at $0$?

Is function $f:\mathbb C-\{0\}\rightarrow\mathbb C$ prescribed by $z\rightarrow \large{\frac{1}{z}}$ by definition discontinuous at $0$? Personally I would say: "no". In my view a function can only ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

What is the definition of $I=(f(X,Y),g(X,Y))$?

What is the definition of this ideal in $\mathbb C[X,Y]\ I=(f(X,Y),g(X,Y))$ for some polynomials $f,g \in \mathbb C[X,Y]$
0
votes
1answer
45 views

definition of product of modules

I have been given this definition of a product between modules: If $I$ is an indexing set with $M_i$ as an $R$-Module then the product $\prod \limits_{i \in I} M_i$ is defined as the set consisting ...
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0answers
52 views

About a variation of the primitive root idea.

Let $n $ be called a half primitive root mod ($m$) if $n^{\phi(m)/2} = 1$ mod($m$) and for any $t $ with $1 < t < \phi(m)/2$, $m$ does not divide $(n^t - 1)$. So the order of $n$ mod($m$) is $\...
1
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1answer
37 views

Why are the summands $-1,0,1$?

I have some problem to understand the following: Let $X=\left\{0,1,2\right\}$ and consider $X^{\mathbb{Z}^d}, d\geq 2$ as being the set of all function from $Z^d$ to $X$. So for $\eta\in X^{\mathbb{Z}...
12
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4answers
321 views

Is it possible to define $\lceil x\rceil$ in terms of $\lfloor\ldots\rfloor$?

I have tried to define the ceiling function of $x$ in terms of its floor function; I thought this might be easy, but it isn't. I can easily do this with a piecewise equation, but I need to do without ...
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0answers
20 views

What is the $\bar{d}$-metric for translation-invariant measures?

I've often heard of the so called $\bar{d}$-metric for translation-invariant measures. I found something like $$ \bar{d}(m_1,m_2)=\inf\text{Prob}^m\left\{\eta(0)\neq\delta(0)\right\}, $$ where $m_1$ ...
2
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0answers
39 views

What is the coupling of two measures?

I know what means coupling for random variables, as explained here. But what is a coupling of measures?
3
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0answers
65 views

Functors that preserve the subset relation on constructs

Is there a name for functors between concrete categories over Set that preserve '$\subset$'? Example, for a functor $F:\mathbf {Top}\to \mathbf {Grp}$, if $Y$ is a subspace of $X$ then $F(Y)$ is a ...
2
votes
2answers
84 views

What is the definition of closed subspace?

I am trying to understand what is intended with closed subspace, I took the following guess: A closed subspace $M$ of a Hilbert space $H$ is a subspace of $H$ s.t. any sequence $\{x_n\}$ of elements ...
0
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2answers
75 views

Do all the properties of exponents work for every real exponent? [closed]

I am writing an essay, but i doubt at typing that the properties of exponents works for every Real, I know it works for every Rational number. $$\forall a,n,m\in\mathbb R$$ or $$\forall a\in\mathbb R,...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Is it possible to have an $a \times b \times c$ matrix?

The book Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach states that a certain variable is a $2 \times 2 \times 2$ matrix", but I thought that matrices could only be rectangular (i.e. $a \times b$). Is it ...
0
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0answers
114 views

What is an undefinable ordinal? How large are the least undefinable ordinal and supremum of all undefinable ordinals?

What does it mean to say that a particular ordinal/cardinal number is "definable"? Where and how do we define this "definability"? If there are undefinable ordinals/cardinals, how large are the least ...
4
votes
3answers
247 views

what is meant by $ f ∈ C^{2}[a, b] ?$

What is the meaning of $ f ∈ C^{2}[a, b] ?$ I think it says that $f$ is twice differential on $[a,b]$, isn't it?
1
vote
1answer
94 views

o-minimal structures and definable functions

Consider the following definition of an o-minimal structure: An o-minimal structure $O=\{O_n\}$ is a sequence of Boolean algebras $O_n$ of subsets of $\mathbb{R}$ which satisfies the following axioms:...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

What's the exact definition of symmetry?

My question is basically the same as this, but I haven't found the answer given satisfying. The definition of symmetry I've come up with is this: Let $X \subseteq R^2$. A symmetry of $X$ is an ...
1
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0answers
81 views

What is a coupling argument?

In an article I've read in a proof that distinguishes two cases something like: "the second case can be shown by an easy coupling argument using the first case." What is a coupling argument? Edit ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Is “small disk” well-defined?

I saw the notion "small disk" very frequently used in literature. For example, in Brunnian braids on surfaces by V. G. Bardakov, R. Mikhailov, V. V. Vershinin, J. Wu, one line reads: Let $P_n(M)$ ...
7
votes
2answers
375 views

Defining sine and cosine

We know the following are true about sine and cosine (and that they can be proven geometrically): $\sin(a+b)=\sin(a)\cos(b)+\sin(b)\cos(a)$ $\cos(a+b)=\cos(a)\cos(b)-\sin(a)\sin(b)$ $\lim\limits_{x\...
7
votes
6answers
621 views

Removable discontinuity question

A quick and easy question on terminology: If we have a function $$f(x) = \frac{x(x-2)}{(x-2)}$$ then clearly the function is not defined at $x = 2$. If we cancel out "$(x-2)$" then the function is ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Definition of rank of an element in tensor algebra

Let $V$ be a vector space over a field $K$ and let $T(V)$ be its tensor algebra; that is, $$T(V)=\displaystyle\bigoplus_{k=0}^{\infty}V^{\otimes k}=K\oplus V\oplus V\oplus(V\otimes V)\oplus(V\otimes V\...
1
vote
3answers
239 views

Is natural numbers set $\mathbb N$ infinite set?

A set with uncountable number of elements is called an infinite set. Is that the set of all natural numbers, $\Bbb N=\text{{$1,2,3,\ldots$}}$ infinite set? As far i know $\Bbb N$ is "countably" ...
0
votes
1answer
141 views

Definition of $\sigma$-algebra. Axioms.

""Def. A family $\mathcal F$ of subsets of $\Omega$ is said to be a $\sigma$-algebra on $\Omega$ if: (A.1) $\Omega\in\mathcal F$ (A.2) $\ A\in\mathcal F\implies\ A^c\in\mathcal F$ (A.3) $\ A_1,...
5
votes
2answers
118 views

Degree of a map $S^0 \to S^0$

By definition the degree of a map $f: S^n \to S^n$ is $\alpha \in \mathbb Z$ such that $f_\ast(z) = \alpha z$ for $f_{\ast}:H_n(S^n) \to H_n(S^n)$. What is the definition of the degree of $f: S^0 \to ...
4
votes
2answers
279 views

Definition of totality in relations

I see two apparently different definitions for totality which don't seem to be equivalent. Definition 1. A relation $R \subset X \times Y$ is total if it associates to every $x \in X$ at least one $y ...
5
votes
2answers
113 views

Singular Points on Algebraic Curves

What does it mean for a point on an algebraic curve (over any field) to be singular? Over $\mathbb{R}$ or $\mathbb{C}$ is means that all derivatives vanish, but how does this definition generalise to ...
0
votes
2answers
155 views

Why $1$ isn't a prime? [duplicate]

I was wondering the reason behind defining the Prime Numbers in a manner of which $1$ isn't an example. I read in Rotman's A First Course in Abstract Algebra that one reason that $1$ is not called a ...
6
votes
3answers
327 views

What's the definition of a “local property”?

Is a property called local if and only if for every point there exists a neighbourhood for which the property is true? For example: Let $X,Y$ be topological spaces. Then $f: X \to Y$ is continuous if ...
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2answers
71 views

Does this definition of “limit point” really work

I am reading Tapp's introduction to matrix groups for undergraduates. He gives the following definition of limit point of a set: A point $p \in \mathbb R^m$ is called limit point of a subset $S \...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

is there a discipline of mathematics that studies graphical versions of various operations?

What I am interested about is a discipline that deals with mathematical operations that can be done graphically, in this case meaning using some kind of "structures" that are manipulated to arrive at ...
4
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2answers
296 views

Confusion about the definition of function

Yesterday I was talking to one of my friends about the definition of function. The formal definition of function is given by Cartesian Products but my friend's question was whether it is possible to ...
0
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0answers
30 views

Correct definition for convergence of a subsequence?

I only have the definition for convergence of a sequence, but can't find a definition for convergence of a subsequence. I have two guesses: For all $\epsilon > 0$, there exists an $N \in \...
2
votes
2answers
649 views

Defining median for discrete distribution

In probability theory, a median of a probability distribution is a number $M$ such that the CDF of this distribution $F_\xi(x)$ satisfies $F_\xi(M)=\frac{1}{2} \tag1$ This works for continuous ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Is there a difference in definition between an increasing sequence and a monotonically increasing sequence?

Is there a difference in definition between an increasing sequence and a monotonically increasing sequence? In some places I see they call it just inc/decreasing and some call it monotonically inc/...
0
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1answer
40 views

Does the word scalar still apply if it's not a vector?

If I take the value of something, say $50$g and I multiply that value by something else, so perhaps $50\text{g} \times 3$ what would that $3$ be called? It acts like a scalar but I'm not sure that ...
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4answers
67 views

Question about proving $\displaystyle\lim_{n\to\infty} n=\infty$ using the limit definition for a converging sequence

Prove $\displaystyle\lim_{n\to\infty} n=\infty$ using the limit definition for a converging sequence. What I did: Suppose by contra position that $n$ tends to a finite real limit $L$, so from the ...
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1answer
58 views

Explanation for the definition of monomials as products of products

I'm attempting to learn abstract algebra, so I've been reading these notes by John Perry. Monomials are defined (p. 23) as $$ \mathbb{M} = \{x^a : a \in \mathbb{N}\} \hspace{10mm} \text{or} \hspace{...
6
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2answers
263 views

Manifold Orientability Definition

In Shigeyuki Morita's Geometry of Differential Forms, orientability is defined in the following way: If we can assign an orientation to each point on a manifold $M$ in such a way that the ...