2
votes
1answer
50 views

Continued fraction expansion of Pi (oeis A001203). [duplicate]

I would like to understand how you get the numbers $$3+\frac{1}{7+\frac{1}{15+\frac{1}{1+\frac{1}{292+...}}}}$$ i.e. $\{3,7,15,1,292,...\}$ (A001203). In the comments of A046965 is explained a method ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

Comment on this Pi Formula? [closed]

I compute Pi in my own way as follows: $$\frac{\pi}{2}=1+\frac{1}{1+\frac{1}{\frac{1}{2}+\frac{1}{\frac{1}{3}+\frac{1}{\frac{1}{4}+\frac{1}{\vdots}}}}}$$ and use ...
6
votes
1answer
177 views

Chinese estimate for $\pi$. Were they lucky?

The famous chinese estimate $\pi\approx\frac{355}{113}$ is good. I think that is too good. As a continued fraction: $$\pi=[3:7,15,1,292,\ldots]$$ That $292$ is a bit too big. Is there a reason for a ...
5
votes
3answers
878 views

How to find continued fraction of pi

I have always been amazed by the continued fractions for $\pi$. For example some continued fractions for pi are: $\pi=[3:7,15,1,292,.....]$ and many others given here. Similarly some nice continued ...
7
votes
5answers
695 views

Is π unusually close to 7920/2521?

EDIT: One can look at a particular type of approximation to $\pi$ based on comparing radians to degrees. If you try to approximate $\pi$ by fractions of the form $180n/(360k+1)$, you can find that ...
10
votes
1answer
395 views

A strange “pattern” in the continued fraction convergents of pi?

From the simple continued fraction of $\pi$, one gets the convergents, $$p_n = \frac{3}{1}, \frac{22}{7}, \frac{333}{106}, \frac{355}{113}, \frac{103993}{33102}, \frac{104348}{33215}, ...
-1
votes
1answer
259 views

Relation between e and pi [closed]

I found the following relation $\pi=3+\frac{1}{5+\frac{1}{7+\frac{1}{9+\dotsb}}}$ known and $e=3-\frac{1}{5-\frac{1}{7-\frac{1}{9-\dotsb}}}$ Can we relate these directly?
12
votes
1answer
181 views

Request for a proof of the following continued-fraction identity

I have been poring over many texts about continued fractions, but none of them seem to be helping me to prove the following beautiful continued-fraction identity (I am nowhere close): $$ ...
3
votes
2answers
81 views

Unique continued fraction

If $x$ is a uniformly random number in $[0,1]$, what distribution should the $n$-th term in its continued fraction expansion follow? What is the expected vale of $a_n$ in $[a_0;a_1,a_2,\dots]$? Here ...