All mathematical questions about computer science, including theoretical computer science, formal methods, verification, and artificial intelligence. For questions about Turing computability, please use the (computability) tag instead. For numerical analysis, use the (numerical-methods) tag. For ...

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139
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14answers
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Is computer science a branch of mathematics?

I have been wondering, is computer science a branch of mathematics? No one has ever adequately described it to me. It all seems very math-like to me. My second question is, are there any books about ...
40
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2answers
1k views

Computation with a memory wiped computer

Here is another result from Scott Aaronson's blog: If every second or so your computer’s memory were wiped completely clean, except for the input data; the clock; a static, unchanging ...
33
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3answers
1k views

Is the 24 game NP-complete?

The $24$ game is as follows. Four numbers are drawn; the player's objective is to make $24$ from the four numbers using the four basic arithmetic operations (in any order) and parentheses however one ...
32
votes
6answers
2k views

Simple “real life” NP-hard problems?

There are many proofs lying around that games like Lemmings or Sudoku or Tetris are NP-hard (generalized version of those games, of course). The proofs, as I recall, are not difficult but not simple ...
28
votes
4answers
912 views

Why do we believe the Church-Turing Thesis?

The Church-Turing Thesis, which says that the Turing Machine model is at least as powerful as any computer that can be built in practice, seems to be pretty unquestioningly accepted in my exposure to ...
27
votes
6answers
3k views

Is the set of all valid C++ programs countably infinite?

I have heard that the set of valid programs in a certain programming language is countably infinite. For instance, the set of all valid C++ programs is countably infinite. I don't understand why ...
25
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5answers
2k views

Can mathematics get from other sciences what it got from physics?

Throughout history, physics has been an unparalleled source of '' inspiration'' for discovering/inventing mathematical ideas, which is due to its ability to describe the physical world. But can this ...
24
votes
1answer
634 views

Always oddly-many ones in the binary expression for $10^{10^{n}}$?

Update: Pending independent verification, the answer to the title question is "no", according to a computation of $q(10) = 11609679812$ (which is even). Let $q(n)$ be the number of ones in the ...
23
votes
12answers
3k views

How is the set of all programs countable?

I'm having a hard time seeing how the number of programs is not uncountable, since for every real number, you can create a program that's prints out that number. Doesn't that immediately establish ...
22
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5answers
4k views

Is a brute force method considered a proof?

Say we have some finite set, and some theory about a set, say "All elements of the finite set $X$ satisfy condition $Y$". If we let a computer check every single member of $X$ and conclude that the ...
19
votes
3answers
1k views

What do bitwise operators look like in 3d?

The hypothetical relation is $z = \mathrm{xor}\left(x,y\right)$ where xor is any bitwise operator such as AND, OR, NAND, etc. I see that these operations may be defined for integers trivially using ...
19
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1answer
383 views

Mathematics of Torrenting

It is more or less common knowledge that a bittorrent network has the potential to be much faster than direct downloads, but I have never seen any real math describing why, or any theoretical bounds ...
18
votes
4answers
2k views

Is chess Turing-complete?

Is there a set of rules that translates any program into a configuration of finite pieces on an infinite board, such that if black and white plays only legal moves, the game ends in finite time iff ...
17
votes
5answers
913 views

What interesting open mathematical problems could be solved if we could perform a “supertask” and what couldn't?

If we had a computer that could perform a countably infinite number of steps of a Turing machine, what currently open problems could we solve? I guess a lot of number theory problems could be solved ...
17
votes
2answers
2k views

Density of halting Turing machines

If we enumerate all Turing machines, $T_1$, $T_2$, $T_3,\ldots,T_n,\ldots$, What is $$\lim_{m\to\infty}\frac{\#\{k\mid k\lt m \text{ and }T_k\text{ halts}\}}{m}\quad?$$ Or does this depend on how we ...
17
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4answers
3k views

Number of ways to partition a rectangle into n sub-rectangles

How many ways can a rectangle be partitioned by either vertical or horizontal lines into n sub-rectangles? At first I thought it would be: ...
17
votes
1answer
462 views

Would relational calculus be Turing-complete if it allowed unsafe queries?

My understanding about Codd's concept of "safe queries" was created to ensure that a query would always terminate. One key ability of a Turing machine is that it can work on infinite calculations ...
16
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the complexity of succinct (binary) Nurikabe?

Nurikabe is a constraint-based grid-filling puzzle, loosely similar to Minesweeper/Nonograms; numbers are placed on a grid to be filled with on/off values for each cell, with each number indicating a ...
15
votes
3answers
5k views

What are NP-complete problems and why are they so important?

I keep hearing questions about whether something is NP-complete, but they never really mention what it is. Why do people care so much about NP-complete problems?
15
votes
6answers
3k views

The Practical Implication of P vs NP Problem

Although whether $$ P = NP $$ is important from theoretical computer science point of view, but I fail to see any practical implication of it. Suppose that we can prove all questions that can be ...
15
votes
1answer
334 views

How to prove there are no more positive integers that are products of 2 and 3 consecutive numbers?

$6$ and $210$ share the property that both are the products of both two and three consecutive numbers. $6$ is $2\times3$ and $1\times2\times3$ and $210$ is $14\times15$ and $5\times6\times7$. It was ...
15
votes
2answers
12k views

What books do you recommend before 'Concrete Mathematics'?

What book(s) do you recommend before Concrete Mathematics? Is something like "Introduction to discrete Mathematics" enough?
15
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6answers
750 views

What are the theorems of mathematics proved by a computer so far?

By theorems, I mean the ones you can find in an undergraduate course of mathematics, not the ones you can find in a textbook of automated proofs. I mean by "proved by a computer" that an existing ...
15
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3answers
3k views

How to Prove a Programming Language is Turing Complete?

I had some thoughts about how to prove the turing completeness of a programming language. I came to the conclusion, that if you could write a program that is able to parse a turing machine program, ...
14
votes
6answers
2k views

What math should a computer scientist take in college?

I'm a computer science major and like many of us we have to take two additional sciences. These two additional science courses are in addition to three semesters of calculus,two semesters of physics, ...
14
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4answers
3k views

Ackermann Function primitive recursive

I am reading the wikipedia page on ackermann's function, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ackermann_function And I am having trouble understanding WHY ackermann's function is an example of a function ...
14
votes
2answers
1k views

In how many ways we can place $N$ mutually non-attacking knights on an $M \times M$ chessboard?

Given $N,M$ with $1 \le M \le 6$ and $1\le N \le 36$. In how many ways we can place $N$ knights (mutually non-attacking) on an $M \times M$ chessboard? For example: $M = 2, N = 2$, ans $= 6$ $M = 3, ...
13
votes
3answers
527 views

Curious Properties of 33

Because my explanation has so many words, I'll start with my question and then you can read the explanation if you need to: The Bernstein Hash method uses the number 33 as a multiplier. From what ...
12
votes
4answers
8k views

Do dynamic programming and greedy algorithms solve the same type of problems?

I wonder if dynamic programming and greedy algorithms solve the same type of problems, either accurately or approximately? Specifically, As far as I know, the type of problems that dynamic ...
12
votes
3answers
785 views

Twenty questions against a liar

Here's one that popped into my mind when I was thinking about binary search. I'm thinking of an integer between 1 and n. You have to guess my number. You win as soon as you guess the correct number. ...
12
votes
3answers
349 views

Etymology of “topological sorting”

This may be a dumb question, but what's "topological" about topological sorting in graph theory? I thought topology was related to geometry and deformations.
12
votes
4answers
202 views

How do you create a nonlinear game that the player can always win?

I thought a lot about this question — and initially, I intended to ask this on gamedev.stackexchange.com — but due to its rather theoretical aspects, I think it might be more appropriate to address a ...
12
votes
3answers
164 views

is there an efficient algorithm for comparing collections of points?

Let's say you have two sets of M points $p_1...p_M$, and $q_1...q_M$, which reside in $\mathbb{R}^N$. Is there an efficient (e.g. polynomial in M and N) algorithm to determine if the point-sets are ...
11
votes
1answer
12k views

Recognizable vs Decidable

What is difference between "recognizable" and "decidable" in context of Turing machines?
11
votes
3answers
283 views

What is necessary to exchange messages between aliens? [closed]

Lets assume that two extreme intelligent species in the universe can exchange morse code messages for the first time. A can send messages to B and B to A, both have unlimited time, but they can not ...
11
votes
5answers
1k views

Why is convexity more important than quasi-convexity in optimization?

In the mathematical optimization literature it is common to distinguish problems according to whether or not they are convex. The reason seems to be that convex problems are guaranteed to have ...
11
votes
1answer
498 views

Assuming $P \neq NP$, do we know whether there are problems which are in $NP$, not in $P$ and are not $NP$ complete?

Here's a question. Have there been any theoretical results showing that if $P \neq NP$, there must exist some problems in $NP$ which are not $NP$-complete and which are not in $P$ either? Just ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Proving the Riemann Hypothesis without revealing anything other than you proved it

Consider the following assertion from Scott Aaronson's blog: Supposing you do prove the Riemann Hypothesis, it’s possible to convince someone of that fact, without revealing anything other ...
10
votes
4answers
719 views

What is undecidability

What does it mean that some problem is undecidable? For instance the halting problem. Does it mean that humans can never invent a new technique that always decides whether a turing machine will ...
10
votes
3answers
606 views

Solving P vs NP with computer

Is it possible to build a computer program that would (eventually) bring a solution to the P vs. NP question?
10
votes
3answers
244 views

Why isn't NP = coNP?

Suppose a language L is in NP. I think that means a nondeterministic Turing machine M can decide it in polynomial time. But then shouldn't it be in co-NP, because can't we define a new Turing machine ...
10
votes
2answers
2k views

Can someone explain the Y Combinator?

The Y combinator is a concept in functional programming, borrowed from the lambda calculus. It is a fixed-point combinator. A fixed point combinator $G$ is a higher-order function (a functional, in ...
10
votes
1answer
634 views

Fast inverse square root trick

I found what appears to be an intriguing method for calculating $$\frac{1}{\sqrt x}$$ extremely fast on this website, with more explanation here. However, the computer-science lingo and ...
10
votes
1answer
186 views

Is it possible that P != NP cannot be proved?

I am probably asking a stupid question but what I gather from a layman explanation of Godel's incompleteness theorem is that it is completely possible that a true statement cannot be derived from ...
10
votes
2answers
308 views

Applications of Geometry to Computer Science

How is differential geometry (or any type of theoretical math) being used in computer science? Any research I have done on this topic leads me to some sort of applied math concept. I know that there ...
10
votes
0answers
331 views

How does a Lehmer Sieve work?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lehmer_sieve Apparently a Lehmer Sieve was a mechanical device that used chains and pulleys to factor numbers and solve diophantine equations. It once was able to factor ...
10
votes
0answers
199 views

Algorithm for obtaining the surface of a mirror

My colleague and I have been trying to implement an algorithm described in the paper "Recovering local shape of a mirror surface from reflection of a regular grid", primary author of which being ...
10
votes
0answers
186 views

Reference on standard types

This question is about what I presume is a basic construction in type theory. The finite types are defined as follows: 0 is a finite type; if $\sigma, \tau$ are finite types, then so is ...
9
votes
2answers
803 views

Two $NP$-complete languages whose union is in $P$?

I've been thinking about transformations on $NP$-complete problems that produce languages known to be in $P$. However, I can't seem to find an example of two $NP$-complete languages whose union is in ...
9
votes
5answers
453 views

Prove that $ 1 + \dfrac{1}{2} + \dfrac{1}{3} + \cdots + \dfrac{1}{n} = \mathcal{O}(\log(n)) $.

Prove that $ 1 + \dfrac{1}{2} + \dfrac{1}{3} + \cdots + \dfrac{1}{n} = \mathcal{O}(\log(n)) $, with induction. I get the intuition behind this question. Clearly, the given function isn’t even growing ...