0
votes
1answer
42 views

generators vs basis of an algebra

Are all bases of an algebra generating sets, but all generating sets are not bases? A basis can only use addition and scalar multiplication to generate an algebra, which means it is a generating ...
4
votes
2answers
105 views

Usage of the term “Free”

What is the difference between free groups and free modules/vector/algebras spaces, or in other words what does free mean in algebra? I have seen two uses of the term free: something of ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

Why are normal subgroups called “Normal”?

Why are normal subgroups called "Normal"? Who is credited with naming them, and why are they named such?
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Do those 'groups' have a name?

Is there a name for 'groups' that only have a neutral element on the right and an inverse for each element on the right ? If there is, does that name also hold for a neutral elt on the right and an ...
0
votes
2answers
122 views

Why do we use the term “equivalent” with Operators but “equal” with Functions?

Why do we speak in terms of "equality" when we deal with functions but "equivalence" when dealing with operators? To elaborate: Two functions, f and g are equal to each other (denoted: f=g) if: ...
6
votes
5answers
601 views

What's the name of this algebraic property?

I'm looking for a name of a property of which I have a few examples: $(1) \quad\color{green}{\text{even number}}+\color{red}{\text{odd number}}=\color{red}{\text{odd number}}$ $(2) \quad ...
1
vote
3answers
133 views

The Name for $\mathbb{R}$, $\mathbb{C}$, $\mathbb{H}$ and $\mathbb{O}$ Exclusively Algebras?

The Wikipedia page for Normed Division Algebras has been redirected to Normed Algebras and the explanation given is that $\mathbb{R}$, $\mathbb{C}$, $\mathbb{H}$ and $\mathbb{O}$ algebras are not the ...
7
votes
1answer
72 views

Is there a name for those commutative monoids in which the divisibility order is antisymmetric?

Every commutative monoid $M$ is naturally equipped with its divisibility preorder, defined as follows. $$x \mid y \leftrightarrow \exists a(ax=y)$$ Is there a name for those commutative monoids such ...
21
votes
3answers
671 views

Who named “Quotient groups”?

Who decided to call quotient groups quotient groups, and why did they choose that name? A lot of identities such as $$\frac{G/A}{B/A}\cong \frac{G}{B}$$ suggest that whoever invented the notation ...
5
votes
1answer
98 views

Additive non-abelian group?

Sometimes I see in books the term "additive abelian groups". In my opinion, when we use addition to represent the group operation, we already have in mind that the operation is commutative. So ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

Soft question (Etymology - Flatness)

Why where flat modules named "flat"? Is it because they are necessarily torsion free so in a "not convoluted" or circular like $\mathbb{Z}/n\mathbb{Z}$ is as a $\mathbb{Z}$-module?
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Is there a phrase to describe those objects of $\mathbf{C}$ that can be expressed as quotients of the algebra freely generated by $X$?

Let $\mathbf{C}$ denote the category of models of an algebraic theory in $\mathbf{Set}.$ Now suppose $X$ is an object of $\mathbf{Set}$. Is there a traditional phrase used to describe those objects of ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Name of an aglebraic structures $(A,*,\cdot)$ weaker than semirings.

I have a set $A$ with two binary operations on it $(A,*,\cdot)$ STRUCTURE A $(A,*)$ is not commutative, is not associative, it has not an identity $(A,\cdot)$ is a commutative group $(a*b)\cdot ...
2
votes
3answers
55 views

What's the name of the set of products of equal to a given value?

Suppose we have the * operator on a set $A$ such that * is associative but not commutative. Given $a$, $b$, $c \in A$, \begin{align*} abc &= (abc) \\ &= (a)(bc) \\ &= (ab)(c) \\ &= ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

When is a binary operation bipotent?

I learnt that $\max(-,-)$ is a bipotent binary operation but I'm not able to find a definition of bipotent operation. QUESTION A binary operation $*:M\times M \rightarrow M$ is bipotent if ...
2
votes
2answers
26 views

Some basic terms from finite group theory, normalising and centralising

In a proof a read the following "Since $H$ and $N$ normalize each other, if follows that $H \subseteq C_G(N)$". I thought normalising just means that one subgroup is normal with respect to the other, ...
0
votes
0answers
73 views

Has this property for algebraic structures got a name?

Given a binary operation $*:M\times M\rightarrow M$. I define the extension of $*$ to the subset of $M$ in the usual way (with $A,B \subseteq M$) $a*A:=\{a\}*A$and $A*a:=A*\{a\}$, ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Is there a term for extending a finite magma by adding coefficients from fields?

For example, the Quaternion numbers at their base have the Cayley table: $ * = \begin{bmatrix} 1 & i & j & k \\ i & -1 & k & -j \\ j & -k & -1 & i \\ k & j ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Is there a term for this property of magmas?

There exists an element of the magma c such that for all x: $ x*x=c $ The consequence of this is that the elements on the diagonal of the Cayley table are all the same, e.a: $ * = \begin{bmatrix} 1 ...
3
votes
1answer
40 views

Is there a term for an algebraic structure with two binary operators that are closed under a set?

For example, let's say we're using the operators +, and *, and the set {0,1,2} The Cayley tables look like this: ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

What are the terms for the elements in the Euclidean algorithm $a = qb + r$?

In a ring $R$ with a Euclidean norm $N$, given $a,b \in R$ with $b\neq 0$, there are elements $q, r$ such that $a = qb + r$. Is there any special terminology for the elements $a,b,q,r$ in this ...
12
votes
3answers
583 views

Why are groups “abelian” but rings “commutative”?

I have never seen, in any text, a ring whose multiplication is commutative being called an "abelian ring", even though this would make perfect sense, because this term would necessarily refer to ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

“Identify” terminology

What does it mean to "identify" two objects in algebra, as distinct from having an isomorphism or automorphism between them? I was led to think about this while reading Stewart's Galois Theory, where ...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

Two natural extensions of every algebra. Extension to subsets or functions.

I don't exactly know the technical meaning of extension, but I was thinking that given a set $A$ and an operation $*$ on it we can extend the set $A$ in a very natural way and thus extend any ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Binary operation (english) terminology

Foreword: I have read R.H. Bruck's A Survey of binary systems, where the notion of halfoperation is given. A halfoperation $\ast$ differs from a (binary) operation since $a\ast b$ may not be defined ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Embedding and monomorphism

What is the difference between an embedding and a monomorphism? As far as I can see, most introductory abstract algebra texts treat them as if they are the same, i.e. an injective function from one ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Terminology with zero divisors

Let $R$ be a commutative ring with identity $1$. If for some $a \in R$ there exists $b \in R$ such that $ab = 1$, then we say that $a$ is a unit and that $b$ is a multiplicative inverse or reciprocal ...
5
votes
1answer
143 views

What is the “opposite” of a forgetful functor?

Consider a category $C$ and a monoid $M$. Consider a functor $F:C\to M$. It maps the objects of $C$ into the only object of $M$. But I don't want it to map every morphism of $C$ into the identity on ...
3
votes
1answer
111 views

Is there a name for the generalization of the concept “Abelian group” where the axiom $-x+x = 0$ is weakened to the following?

Is there a name for the generalization of the concept "Abelian group" where the axiom $−x+x=0$ is replaced by the following list? $−0=0$ $−(x+y)=−x+−y$ $−(−x)=x$ $x+(-x)+x = x$ In multiplicative ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

What's the name of the mathematical structure with is an abstraction of things like linear Independence?

This is a terrible question, I know. I can't remember the details for some reason, but I think (hope?) that anyone who's familiar with this object will immediately know what I'm talking about.
5
votes
0answers
46 views

Is there a name for the algebra of substructures?

Let $X$ denote an entropic algebra (see here), which just means that all the operations of $X$ are homomorphisms $X^n \rightarrow X.$ Abelian groups are the classic example. Then for any operation of ...
4
votes
2answers
102 views

Have action/predicate systems (or similar) been considered in the literature?

Question. Has the following concept, or anything similar, been considered in the literature? Definition. An action/predicate system consists of sets $A$ (the actions) and $X$ (the predicates) such ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

Weakened associativity axiom: $(x * y) * z \leq x*(y*z).$

Call a partially ordered magma $(X,*)$ sub-associative iff it satisfies the following axiom. $$(x*y)*z \leq x*(y*z).$$ Basically, this is saying that we may shuffle brackets right to get a larger ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Meaning of 'Isomorphism (with respect to inclusion)'

This is the first time that I see this phrase. I'm reading Commutative Algebra by N.Bourbaki. I'll extract 2 propositions that use this phrase. The first one is on page 68 of the book. ...
2
votes
0answers
70 views

Do subhomomorphisms / subfunctors have a standard name, and where can I learn more?

Sorry for all the mistakes in the original! I think they're mostly fixed now. Thank you for your patience. Part 1. If $A$ and $B$ are models in $\mathrm{Pos}$ of an algebraic signature $\sigma$, ...
2
votes
1answer
97 views

The Empty Relation?

In elementary set theory, a relation on sets $A,B$ is usually defined as a subset of $A\times B$. We know that there are $2^{|A\times B|}$ subsets of $|A\times B|$. One of these subsets is the empty ...
4
votes
1answer
62 views

What is the correct usage of the terms ‘under’ and ‘over’ in abstract algebra?

For example, the Wikipedia article on rings states that a ring is: an abelian group under addition a monoid under multiplication multiplication distributes over addition
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Name for this axiom $(X \bullet R) \sqcup (Y \bullet S) \equiv (X \sqcup Y) \bullet (R \sqcup S)$

I am trying to give a name to this axiom in a definition: $(X \bullet R) \sqcup (Y \bullet S) \equiv (X \sqcup Y) \bullet (R \sqcup S)$ (for all $X, Y, R, S$) where $\sqcup$ is the join of a ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Definition of $p$-torsion module

Let $p$ be a prime. What is the definition of a $p$-torsion module ? I have googled but was not convinced.
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Is there a name for magmas in which $y*(a*b) = (y*a)*(y*b)$?

Let $X$ and $Y$ denote magmas, suppose $f$ is a homomorphism $X \rightarrow Y$, and let $y \in Y$ satisfy the following condition. $$\forall a,b \in Y : y*(a*b) = (y*a)*(y*b)$$ Then $y * f$ is a ...
2
votes
0answers
50 views

Taking the (pseudo)inverse of a monoid operation.

Let $M$ be a monoid with binary operation $f : M \times M \to M$. I'm interested in functions $g : M \to M\times M$ that obey the property: $$ f(g(m)) = m $$ I want to understand what all of the ...
6
votes
2answers
108 views

Terminology: How should we call $\mathbb{Z}[\sqrt{5}]$?

I'm wondering, what shall we call the ring $\mathbb{Z}[\sqrt{5}]$? I know that $\mathbb{Z} \left[ \frac{1+\sqrt{5}}{2} \right]$ is called a quadratic integer ring. But do we have something similar for ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Is there a name for magmas with $[x+y]+[x'+y'] \equiv [x+x']+[y+y']$?

Is there a name for magmas (written additively) satsisfying the following identity? The square brackets have no particular signifance, but will hopefully promote readability in what follows. ...
0
votes
3answers
166 views

Why are group theory and ring theory a part of abstract algebra?

I have followed the courses Algebra 1, which was about group theory and Algebra 2, which was about ring theory. I don't think I really understand why those subjects are part of abstract algebra. What ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

Terminology regarding elements of monoids

In what follows, the symbols $a,b$ and $n$ implicitly range over $\mathbb{N} = \{0,1,2,\cdots\}.$ Are there names for the following properties that an element $x$ in a monoid may or may not possess? ...
2
votes
1answer
246 views

A module as an external direct product of the kernel and image of a function

If $f:A\rightarrow A$ is an R-module homomorphism such that $ff=f$, show that $$A=Ker\,\,f\oplus Im\,\, f$$ Here is a part of what I made as a proof. Let $a\in A$. $f(a)\in Im\,\,f$, ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

First Homomorphism Theorem and terminology

I am not finding clear terminology in my abstract algebra book to be clear at least and my questions are simple. Consider the construction of a quotient group G': \begin{equation} G/K = G' ...
0
votes
1answer
315 views

Definition: finite type vs finitely generated

The mathematical term "finite type" appears more and more in the modern articles nowadays. But it is still hard to be found in the standard textbooks. I learned the definition of it from Stacks ...
4
votes
3answers
111 views

What is meant by 'runs through'?

I'm independently studying abstract algebra for fun (not my forte...) and I'm reading Herstein. He has a question in the chapter on rings: Let $p$ be an odd prime and ...
5
votes
0answers
130 views

Why are they called orbits?

When we study actions in group theory, we consider sets of the form $$\text{Orb}_G(x)=\{gx\mid g\in G\} $$ that are called orbits. Although, the only reason I find convincing for that name is that in ...