Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mathematics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people studying math at any level and professionals in related fields. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had a bad Math teacher (really, terrible), and I also didn't imagine that was such a lovely world and in every thing we do, Math can be applied.

Plus I took the technical path in school (Industrial Electronics), so the area of learning was a bit different than the normal school as the technical path would put us into a new job at the end of the 12 grade (high-school), so we lack or not went depth enough important areas like derivation and integration ...

when I went to the university... well... that was alien cryptography to me, and soon realized that I would be better with 1 year off school learning what I never gave.

My point now (and passed almost 16 years of university days), with so much online courses for all developing languages such as PHP, .NET, Ruby... (I'm a developer, so it's eay for my to find the best online courses as I'm in the area) is there a good one that we know, well... Mathematics!

since Matrix numbers to linear functions... that teach us to re-like Math above all...

I'm with a certain dificult finding such courses/tutorials :(

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by lhf, Asaf Karagila, Zev Chonoles Feb 19 '12 at 16:24

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well such courses are available in numerous sites. Both quantity and quality are admirable.

To begin with:

MIT's opencourseware- a complete archive of pdfs and video lectures with many subjects in Math, physics, engineering and whatnot.

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/#mathematics

Berkeley's version of the opencourseware:

http://webcast.berkeley.edu/series.html#c,d,Mathematics

Stanford has started interactive online courses. You have to register-but all free- and they will keep posting lectures notes, videos and even quizzes. You have to complete those and your assignments etc. are also graded accordingly.

http://see.stanford.edu/see/courses.aspx

ISI Bangalore also has some course notes etc. on their site.

http://www.isibang.ac.in/~statmath/resource/notes.html

Plus, for a layman's intuitive introduction to any mathematical topic, there are wikipedia and wolphram mathworld.

All this is of course tip of the iceberg. Countless other sites have much to share as well. But I hope these sites will be useful as a good starter for you.

share|improve this answer
    
This courses are really the "american" way of teaching, witch for an European, it's a terrible way to learn :( and that's very well described in the The Finland Phenomenon and they're very wide range and not one-on-one videos... I was looking for something else –  balexandre Jan 6 '12 at 15:50
    
Well I would suggest availing yourself of whatever the net has to offer..I personally find such courses very much helpful. For example, the linear algebra course by prof. Gilbert Strang of MIT is awesome, as is the machine learning course by Stanford. One-on-one is the best method, no doubt, but in absence of such lectures, one must do best with what one has. As for Finland phenomenon, I would only say that different countries-->different scenarios-->different methods. –  Nikhil Bellarykar Jan 6 '12 at 17:47
add comment

Here's one resource you might want to cosider: “The Math Reference project is essentially a self-paced tutorial/archive, written in English/html, that takes the reader through modern mathematics using modern techniques.” link to main page: http://www.mathreference.com/main.html

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.