Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mathematics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people studying math at any level and professionals in related fields. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Often I have heard about the link between Algebra (in particular Representations of Groups and Algebras) and some "indefinite" field of Physics.

I have a good preparation in Algebra and Representation Theory (in particular about Representations of Lie Algebras), and I'm fascinated with Physics. My idea is try to understand this link and eventually study it with more depth.

Hence I'm looking for an introductory book that emphasizes the applications of Algebra in Physics from a comprehensible and mathematical point of view.

Does anyone have an idea for a book with these requisites?

Thank you!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Howard Georgi's "Lie Algebras in Particle Physics" is good, if more intended for the physicist going towards the math than vice versa. It should provide a lot of context, though, and there's a PDF version floating around on google. I'd say similar things about these two introductions to aspects of high-energy theory [1] [2].

I'll see if I can remember some other good ones.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you think of Varadarajan's ? see math.ucla.edu/~vsv –  James S. Cook Jul 26 at 0:58
    
+1 for Georgi's book, although, as you mentioned, it was written with physicists in mind it actually does not required previous knowledge of quantum mechanics, and it is filled with comments on how representation theory of Lie algebras interact with physics, even containing some advanced stuff about grand unification and chirality in extra dimensions. It is spot on for the question, as a good place to study before going on to a proper physics book –  cesaruliana Jul 26 at 14:49

Peter Woit, the author of the book "Not Even Wrong" and a blog by the same name, has been working on a book on quantum mechanics as described by representation theory. The latest draft may be found at the following link:

Quantum Theory, Groups and Representations: An Introduction.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.