Mathematics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people studying math at any level and professionals in related fields. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

I am reading about active contours models. It is said that this can be broadly classified as either parametric active contour models and geometric active contour models. The first one are represented explicitly as parameterized curves in a Lagragian framework, while the geometric active contours are represented implicitly as level sets of a 2-dimensional function that evolves in a Eulerian framework.

What is an Eulerian approach and an Lagragian approach?

Thanks,

share|cite|improve this question
3  
Mind mentioning where (e.g. book, website) you encountered these? – J. M. Sep 21 '10 at 14:46
3  
The more specific you make the question the better the response you will get. Can you add more details please? – alext87 Sep 21 '10 at 15:01
    
I am reading about active contours models. It is said that this can be broadly classified as either parametric active contour models and geometric active contour models. The first one are represented explicitly as parameterized curves in a Lagragian framework, while the geometric active contours are represented implicitly as level sets of a 2-dimensional function that evolves in a Eulerian framework. – Ilda Reis Sep 21 '10 at 15:11
1  
It might be helpful for you to edit your question to include the information in your comment. – Isaac Sep 21 '10 at 15:48
    
Downvoting and voting to close because the bot is bumping it unnecessarily. – anon Oct 21 '10 at 17:07

There is a Eulerian vs. Lagrangian distinction in fluid mechanics: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrangian_and_Eulerian_specification_of_the_flow_field

share|cite|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.