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I am working on some signal processing and I have the following data:

[[-344    13771   4600 ]
 [-275.2  12478   6410 ]
 [-206.4  19443    830 ]
 [-137.6  69392   3830 ]
 [ -68.8  143737  3780 ]
 [   0    189278 16870 ]
 [  68.8  184486  5090 ]
 [ 137.6  188466  9380 ]
 [ 206.4  185023 21680 ]
 [ 275.2  128133  1460 ]
 [ 344    51288   1950 ]
 [ 412.8  10854   4290 ]]

The first column are x values and the second are y values. The third column is for noise, but I am currently ignoring that.

I know that this data is the convolution of a slit of width 83.666 and the response (which I want to find). So to do this, I try and use

fftshift(fft(measured))./sinc(x./83.66)

Then I take the ifft() of what is above, and I get data that does not make sense. I am wondering if this lies in the fact that the convolution property does not hold in the case of a discrete Fourier Tranform (fft).

share|improve this question
    
The convolution property does indeed hold for discrete FTs. –  AnonSubmitter85 Jun 26 '13 at 19:16
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