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Many mathematics departments has provided video lessons their courses (usually one semester) that are offered in their doctoral programs in mathematics. Most often these courses total average of 26 videos each containing a single class. Below is a list of introdutory courses on video.

I would appreciate if people could add on to this list.

Observation To a greater audience reach classes should preferably be in English language and introdutory curses.

Observation I will not be specific as to the area of investigation. Since I believe that the answers here will be useful for students who are not my area of interest. But I have a preference for introdutory courses of Ergodic Theory, Probability, Stochastic Processes, Combinatorics and Statistical Mechanics.

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Could you be more specific of what areas you are interested in? The whole point of doctoral level courses is that they generally dispense of the basics. –  Alex R. May 14 '13 at 21:39
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@Alex I will not be specific as to the area of investigation. Since I believe that the answers here will be useful for students who are not my area of interest. But I have a preference for courses ergodic theory, Probability, Stochastic Processes, Combinatorics and Statistical Mechanics. –  Elias May 14 '13 at 21:42
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I think that from the three examples you gave @Elias, at least the first two are basic stuff from first-second graduate year at most. Yes, they can serve as basis to develop some research, but I'd hardly identify them as PhD material per se, though some subjects in them (as in almost any other area) can be, of course. –  DonAntonio May 14 '13 at 22:05
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@DonAntonio, well the videos I listed in my question is just to illustrate my point –  Elias May 14 '13 at 22:23
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@DonAntonio I'm slightly puzzled by your comment. If something is from the "first-second graduate year", isn't it by definition at the doctoral level? What is the distinction between "PhD material" and material in courses offered as part of a PhD program? –  Jim Belk May 14 '13 at 22:33
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is a very much related thread on MathOverflow with a lot of links.

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