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I am looking for study and beginner material to study mathematical logic. I understand that it is a very broad topic but I would like to know what the best path there is to learning mathematical logic. Where should one start? What are the best resources? If someone could paint a time line of events that should take place in order to gain a good understanding of mathematical logic, that would be fantastic. I have seen this question but it does not give the depth I require.

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What's wrong with, for instance, Peter Smith's answer. –  Git Gud Apr 27 '13 at 17:08
    
@GitGud I had not seen that but it looks to be comprehensive. So are the resources mentioned in the guide the best or really good? I only say this because I am completely new to studying logic and I want the resources to explain step-by-step the formulations and the reasoning. I find that some of the resources move too quickly or expect you to know a host of things before you can learn the said topic. –  gekkostate Apr 27 '13 at 17:12
    
To be honest I don't know, I haven't gone through Peter Smith's material yet. You should ping (or e-mail) him. –  Git Gud Apr 27 '13 at 17:16
    
gekkostate: see Peter Smith's site logicmatters.net. Yes, Peter Smith's work is a great resource. –  amWhy Apr 27 '13 at 17:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. For a heavily annotated and detailed Guide to teaching yourself logic by a selection from the many many available books, try my Teach Yourself Logic at http://www.logicmatters.net/students/tyl/ It aims precisely to enable a student to move on "step-by-step".

  2. I'm not sure quite what you mean by "paint[ing] a time line of events that should take place in order to gain a good understanding of mathematical logic"; but TYL does have a crude map of the way areas of mathematical logic relate to each other which might help.

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I am reading your .pdf right now and it contains exactly what I am looking for. The timeline, I am talking about is the correct steps that should be taken to learn logic. I find that I jump from one concept to another have holes but the tree on page 9 of your .pdf is exactly what I was looking for. To learn "baby logic" then first order logic etc. So, thank you. –  gekkostate Apr 27 '13 at 18:32
    
Glad you think it is what you are looking for! –  Peter Smith Apr 27 '13 at 18:39

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