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Lets say someone (a reputable or non reputable mathematician) has come up with a remarkable one page proof to a famous maths problem.

Lets say the proof is likely correct but hasn't been released to the scrutiny of other mathematicians.

What would be the best way to release the proof to the world?

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closed as not a real question by copper.hat, Micah, Alexander Gruber, Clive Newstead, Haskell Curry Jan 8 '13 at 8:48

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
If it hasn't been released to the scrutiny of other mathematicians then to release it to the world can be a rather reckless step: even Wiles, after presenting his supposed demonstration of FLT, had to back off for a while because of an apparently fatal flaw, and without the help of R. Taylor it is very likely that we'd still be waiting and searching for a proof. –  DonAntonio Jan 8 '13 at 5:55
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If it's just one page, post it here. –  Vectk Jan 8 '13 at 5:57
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Or in the margin, if it will fit... –  copper.hat Jan 8 '13 at 6:16
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Not here. This site is not the appropriate place for that. –  Mariano Suárez-Alvarez Jan 8 '13 at 6:34
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What's wrong with asking whether one's proof is correct? I thought those type of questions were allowed here. –  Vectk Jan 8 '13 at 7:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Write a paper, post it on the arXiv, send it to a journal.

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