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First time here, more frequent over at StackOverflow. So not sure if calculator questions are accepted here, but I'll ask.

Is there a quick way to solve problems like this in the ti-83:

  1. 82% shot success rate out of 7 shots taken, find odds of exactly 3 shots going in, more than 5 shots going in. (I know how to do the written out way using nCr but it would save time on the exam if I knew a faster way).

  2. Lets say 10% of people pay $\$$30, 70% pay $\$$52, and 20% pay $\$$60. Is there a way to get the mean and standard deviation of that by modifying the stats on ti-83 (I know, very easy mean is (.1*30)+... just wondering if there a way without entering 30 1 time and 52 7 times and so on in L1 then calculating the 1 var stats.

Thanks!

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Figured out number 2 here: calculator.maconstate.edu/binomial_probability/index.html since I found out what its called. –  NoviceCoding Mar 15 '11 at 4:36
    
Just so you know, I fixed your formatting. The use of a dollar sign throws the text into math mode (as with LaTeX), and that messed up part of your question 2. –  Mike Spivey Mar 15 '11 at 5:17
    
Thanks man. Was wondering what was up with that. –  NoviceCoding Mar 25 '11 at 19:03
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your first question, my first answer :-)

1a. 2nd--->distr--->binompdf--->(7, 0.82, 3) 1b. 1 - 2nd--->distr--->binomcdf--->(7, 0.82, 5) Note thats CDF, not pdf

  1. Enetering 7 52's can be done easily, but I don't rememebr how. Sorry.
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Thanks man! Sorry would have responded earlier but was out of town! –  NoviceCoding Mar 25 '11 at 19:11
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