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I'm looking for a calculator that shows a full answer regardless of it's length.

For example the assignment 2^1000 will output: 1,07150860718626732094842504906e+301. Windows calculator shows me that amount because else it won't fit the display.

So the question is: Is there a calculator out there that shows the full answer instead of shortening it?

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3  
What do you expect this hypothetical calculator to display when you enter $\sqrt{ 2 }$ ? –  Mike Scott Feb 17 '11 at 14:23
    
huh? you mean 4? –  Pieter888 Feb 17 '11 at 14:26
    
No, I mean 1.41421356..., continuing for ever without repeating. –  Mike Scott Feb 17 '11 at 14:28
    
Oh, alright. I'm not looking to calculate pi or 10/3. just some sums with very long answers. –  Pieter888 Feb 17 '11 at 14:31
1  
Unix has bc for this, what does Windows have? –  GEdgar Jun 1 '11 at 13:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you don't mind a web-based solution, wolframalpha.com will do that for you:

http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=2^1000

outputs:

10715086071862673209484250490600018105614048117055336074437503883703510511249361224931983788156958581275946729175531468251871452856923140435984577574698574803934567774824230985421074605062371141877954182153046474983581941267398767559165543946077062914571196477686542167660429831652624386837205668069376

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Thanks! That's exactly the kind of calculator I need :) –  Pieter888 Feb 17 '11 at 14:32
5  
but even wolfram won't calculate Ack(5,5), so i guess it's a temporary solution :D –  kneidell Feb 17 '11 at 14:36

Have a look at this site: it is dedicated to large number factorizations, but you can also make some integer based operations. You can input "2^1000" and try.

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Also a nice one. thanks! –  Pieter888 Feb 18 '11 at 11:42

You can also consider Maple, and Pari-GP.

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pari.math.u-bordeaux.fr –  Charles Nov 14 '11 at 0:35

Of course not. Any computer (e.g. calculator) has finite memory, so there will always be numbers that are too long to display fully.

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Wims Function Calculator also gives 10715086071862673209484250490600018105614048117055336074437503883703510511249361224931983788156958581275946729175531468251871452856923140435984577574698574803934567774824230985421074605062371141877954182153046474983581941267398767559165543946077062914571196477686542167660429831652624386837205668069376.

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