Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mathematics Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for people studying math at any level and professionals in related fields. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are there any publicly available lists of open problems in set theory besides the following ones? (And if so, what are they?)

http://www.math.wisc.edu/~miller/res/problem.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_unsolved_problems_in_mathematics#Set_theory

http://wwwmath.uni-muenster.de/logik/Personen/rds/list.html

share|improve this question
1  
Hi Trevor. A good source is shelah.logic.at/files/666.pdf although a couple there may be solved now. For problems in the partition calculus, ErdÅ‘s has several lists in papers, renyi.hu/~p_erdos And the nice book by Peter Komjath and Vilmos Totik also list quite a few, cs.elte.hu/~kope/setproblems.html –  Andres Caicedo Sep 23 '12 at 1:15
    
@Andres Thanks for the references. For the last one, the web page says that the book contains full solutions to all the problems. Does that just mean "to all the solved problems"? –  Trevor Wilson Sep 23 '12 at 1:31
    
Hehe. Yes, the book is written as a problem book, but they mention many questions along the way. –  Andres Caicedo Sep 23 '12 at 1:35
    
Hi Trevor, in case you are still in Fields, you should probably go to Menachem Magidor and ask him what about his list. I suggest he'd make one and talk about it in Fields, but when we met yesterday he said that he did not do that yet. I then mentioned this thread and said that I wanted to point out that he was to have one, and that I wanted to point you to him. He said that I could do that, so I am doing that. Constant reminders would force him to actually do that, and then everybody will be happy. :-) –  Asaf Karagila Nov 27 '12 at 20:06
1  
Some of these are set-theoretic in flavour; perhaps you will find them interesting: essex.ac.uk/maths/people/fremlin/problems.htm –  tci May 12 '13 at 23:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.