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I know basic of mathematics (I was good at it at school). But when I took a job and totally forgot about everything. Right now I was drag into some conference about Graph. If someone could help me with this:

1) Graph - is a set of abstractions witch connected with each other only by pairs (is this correct?)

2) What types of Graph there are?

3) Is "Mind Map" a Graph? And if it is, then what type?

4) Is there any mathematical explanation of WHY "Mind Map" is so popular? (at least I think that it's popular

5) What "algorithms" there are to work with Graphs?

6) Is there any books, tutorials, articles about Graphs and Mind Maps that I can read about?

7) Is there any videocasts about Graphs?

PS: I know it's a lame questions. But if you can help me with at leas on of those I will be really gratefull.

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Have you tried Wikipedia? –  Rahul Jul 28 '12 at 0:34
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It is hard to learn something well in one day. –  William Jul 28 '12 at 1:46
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If you can imagine an entire book that answers your question, you’re asking too much. –  Henning Makholm Jul 28 '12 at 3:36
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I am indeed chastened that a person desperately trying to learn an entire field of mathematics in 24 hours is giving me pity. :) –  Rahul Jul 28 '12 at 6:37
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@Ai_boy So you asked a bunch of strangers on the internet instead? Also, Wikipedia is extremely reliable for mathematics. I routinely use it to check textbooks, and have found it more accurate than most of them. –  Alex Becker Jul 28 '12 at 6:39
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closed as too localized by BenjaLim, William, user26872, Henning Makholm, Asaf Karagila Jul 28 '12 at 6:43

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. You can read about the definition and basics of what is a graph here

  2. There are many types of graphs, for example: trees, connected, circle, planar and many more.

  3. This is not a concept in graph theory as far as I know

  4. see 3

  5. Many! The basic algorithems in my opinion are BFS and DFS, a look at Introduction to Algorithms by Cormen might help you find what you need.

I don't know about (6) and (7), but I would say that graph theory and algorithms that work on graphs is NOT something you can learn in a day, an undergraduate student takes a whole course only to talk about the algorithms part, and about 0.5 of a course dedicated to basic graph theory

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tnx) I'm still going to try to learn at least basics of it in 1 day. At least I won't be this stupid :) –  Ai_boy Jul 28 '12 at 5:57
    
+1 for 3) and 4) –  Donkey_2009 Aug 24 '13 at 12:07
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Check out the book "Social Network Analysis for Startups: Finding connections on the social web" I asked alot of questions about graph theory on stackoverflow and someone suggested that book.

It gave me a great introduction and used real interesting examples(find connections between or analysis a terrorist network to figure out who the leader is based on communication flows). Every example in the book was interesting and you are provided with alot of chances to code the examples yourself(they use python and networkx module).

Its not too big of a book and you can finish it in a day if you dedicate yourself. You may not become a expert but it'll at least give you a understand and increase your ability to know where to look next(or ask better questions)

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