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Suppose we have a compact set $K$. I know that the space $C(K,\mathbb{C})$ of continuous functions is complete with respect to the norm $\|f\| = \sup_{x\in K} |f(x)|$. Let $L^{\infty}$ be the space of bounded measurable functions (with the Borel subsets as $\sigma$-algebra). Is $C(K,\mathbb{C})$ pointwise dense in $L^{\infty}$ ?

Now, if this is true and suppose that $K$ is a compact subset of $\mathbb{C}$. I know from the Stone-Weierstrass Theorem that the polynomials on $K$ are uniformly dense in $C(K,\mathbb{C})$, so certainly pointwise dense. Are the polynomials on $K$ also dense in $C(K,\mathbb{C})$ ?

Any help would be appreciated.

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See also this related thread –  t.b. Jun 7 '12 at 7:30
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What do you mean by pointwise-dense? $C(K)$ is not dense in $L^\infty$ because $C(K)$ is complete in the $\sup$-norm. –  AD. Jun 7 '12 at 7:31
    
I mean that when you look at $C(K)$ and $L^{\infty}$ as subspaces of $K^{\mathbb{C}}$ with the product topology, does the closure of $C(K)$ contain $L^{\infty}$ ? –  KevinDL Jun 7 '12 at 7:34
    
On the other hand, given a measureable function $f$ there is a sequence $f_n\in C(K)$ such that $\lim_{n\to\infty}f_n(x)=f(x)$ for almost all $x$. But I am sure this is not what you mean. –  AD. Jun 7 '12 at 7:37
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Re: "I know from the Stone-Weierstrass Theorem that the polynomials on $K$ are uniformly dense in $C(K,\mathbb C)$". -- This is not true in general; $K=\{z:|z|=1\}$ is a counterexample. See Mergelyan's theorem. –  ˈjuː.zɚ79365 Jun 19 '13 at 13:31

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